7 Ways To Increase Your Chances of Getting Followed Back on Instagram

Following Symbol InstagramOne thing that’s intrigued me since I started on Instagram is the sheer number of follow/unfollows that flood through my account on a regular basis.  I’m not talking about the ones that retreat gracefully after a few months, but those that bail after a couple of days and I find myself asking the question – what do these users want? Connection? Numbers? Recognition? I’m sure that these experiments work occasionally, but the people fly in and out of my page so quickly that I don’t even have time to notice them.  And I’m not someone who only connects with big accounts – for me quality counts over quantity. I’m just as likely to follow someone with 300 followers as 100K although I admit it’s rarer for me to commit these days as I struggle to keep up with my current follows.

So what makes me want to follow back?  A combination of factors – some less obvious than others, but there are certain elements that make me more inclined to hit that button:

A Public Account

This is essential for me – and I’m guessing for many others too.  If I can’t see what you’re posting then I’m highly unlikely to follow even if your numbers are stellar (exceptions for family & friends of course).

Consistent Interaction

I’m primarily on Instagram for the community and I try to be a pretty loyal follower (although it’s not quite as easy with the new algorithm) so this is really key for me. If someone follows me and then interacts over a period of time then I’m more likely to follow them back. In my first year, I could see engagement through likes, but comments are more visible these days.  We’re not talking stalker-territory here – just the occasional meaningful response which shows that we share common ground. I’ve been caught out by professional follow/unfollowers (including sizeable accounts) in the past so I’m pretty cautious about jumping in quickly.

Quality Content

Beautiful and creative photos always catch my eye, but the caption is important too. I love it when a kind voice shines through or gives me a new angle of life/books/art/creativity/nature. The same goes for good business, travel, lifestyle or social media advice – I like to learn from others and find out more about their unique take on a range of subjects. It has to be gentle though – hard sells are a no-no.

Sociability

The comments on people’s posts are often revealing as they give me an idea about how they interact with their own followers  – whether this is a social space for them or just a place to grow numbers. I realise that not everyone has the time to chat so it’s not a deal breaker especially if the content is exceptional, but it’s definitely a consideration.

Similar Connections

When I first started out, checking mutual accounts wasn’t as important because I was still feeling my way with the platform and actively looking for people to follow, but as my circles have widened, this is something I take notice of. If an account follows similar pages to mine then it suggests that we are more likely to share the same values and aesthetics.  I trust the people I already follow so if there’s a link between us, however small, I’m more inclined to think that we might be a good match.

Additional Online Resources

Blogs, courses and podcasts always make me sit up as long as they’re not too salesy. They show that the person takes their online presence seriously and is striving to offer useful information to their audience.

Adverts and Business Accounts

The controversial one! There’s been a lot of backlash against ads but as a part of the bookstagramming community, I’ve been used to them from day one as most bookstagrammers post gifted books on their pages.  I also follow lots of mums who make extra money from influencing so this isn’t an issue for me unless an account is overtly promotional.

For business accounts it’s harder.  I rarely follow these unless I really love the brand or the product/service.  I could write a whole post on this subject – lots of businesses miss the mark which is a shame as they could maximise their accounts quite easily.

As I spend more time on the platform though,  being followed back isn’t the number one concern. I subscribe to accounts without any expectation of reciprocation because I love their content and in my eyes that’s the only way to find real satisfaction on Instagram – not through numbers, but through careful curation.  In the words of William Morris “If you want a golden rule that will fit everything, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting Featured on the Instagram Weekend Hashtag Project (#WHP)

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**Hooray! Four months after this post was first published, I was featured again for #WHPdailylife **

Last week, the wonderful and hugely exciting happened – my photo of a book tree was featured on Instagram after I entered the #whp🌲 challenge.  Since then, nearly 600K people have seen my hallway which is mind-boggling!  My personal account has also received a boost. I’ve gained over 2000 followers since the photo was posted and have had lovely comments from all over the world. I am so grateful for each and every one especially after taking such a creative leap this year.

But the real reason I’ve written this post is to shed some light on the challenge itself so that others can join in and have a chance of being featured too.

The Weekend Hashtag Project (#WHP) is announced by Instagram on Fridays (late GMT) so first of all, you need to follow their main account.  Each week, they set a new prompt with an accompanying photo or video as an example of what they’re looking for.  The rules do change for time to time so keep checking, but here are the guidelines from last week:

PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPoddlysatisfying hashtag only to photos and videos shared over this weekend and only submit your own visuals to the project. If you include music in your video submissions, please only use music to which you own the rights. Any tagged photo or video shared over the weekend is eligible to be featured next week.

You then have the weekend to post material which matches the theme.  After this time, Instagram then selects up to 6 entries to be featured. If you’re new to the WHP, I recommend looking back over past features to get a feel for the successful content. Creative shots often get picked, but so do other styles – and captions count too.  Account size doesn’t make a difference – I had just over 2500 followers when I was chosen so tiny by Instagram standards.

I think my biggest piece of advice for the WHP is to have fun with it. Use it to view the world in a fresh way. Anything goes so be playful and free – find your voice. This was my 9th attempt so it’s worth persisting.

As always, if you have any questions about the challenge, get in contact with me via the comments or the contact page.

 

 

 

 

Ten Things I’ve Learned in a Year of Instagram

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To say that Instagram has changed my life isn’t an overstatement.  Joining the community has given me courage to leave my traditional job and try to live in a way that’s a lot more satisfying. When I started posting @thebookfamilyrogerson back in April 2017, I had no idea what to expect and what came out of that initial leap was a lot more exciting and meaningful than I ever anticipated. Here are the top ten things that I’ve learned in a year of being an instagrammer:

  1. Instagram is the most positive social media application on the web. I also hang out at Twitter and Facebook and both have their merits, but neither can match Insta when it comes to supportiveness , creativity and fun.  I count my Instagram followers as real friends.
  2. Bookstagram means you can be part of an international book group and read the same book at the same time with friends all over the world! I know that this sounds obvious, but it blew my mind when I was comparing notes with pals in the US, New Zealand, the Philippines and the UK simultaneously.
  3. If you want to take the pressure off producing for the main gallery then post in the stories instead.  The content is only temporary so it doesn’t need to be perfect – plus you can play with GIFs and stickers.
  4. You get out what you put in. Very rarely can you simply post photographs and expect everyone to react.  Treat people as you would in real life, appreciate it when they reach out to you and reciprocate with goodwill.
  5. Snapseed is a great free tool for editing photographs. If you’re up to paying, then check out other apps like VSCO where you can store presets.
  6. Feel the fear and post it anyway.  Instagram is a great place to stretch your creativity. If you don’t like what you’ve produced, you can always archive it.
  7. Don’t compare yourself to others. This one is really hard sometimes, but everyone will have their own doubts. Better to focus on your own vision, values and aesthetic.
  8. Likewise, try to ignore the algorithm. I’ve had all sorts of mad theories about how to beat it since I’ve been posting but none of them work! One thing I would mention is that quality will get noticed in the long run though.  Share your best and the likes will come eventually.
  9. If you want to develop your account, there’s lots of free quality advice out there. I recommend following Me and Orla, Bookish Bronte, Allthatisshe and Herinternest for valuable tips.
  10. Don’t let Instagram rule your life.  It’s addictive so keep it contained. If you want a break , take as long as you need.  The people who enjoy your company will be still be there when you return.

What are your thoughts about Instagram? Do you love it, hate it or somewhere in between?